Sunday, July 29, 2018

Fall 2018 Tai Chi Classes in Minneapolis


Look Forwards to Fall Classes!

A new beginners class will start Sunday evenings, starting September 16th at 6 p.m. This is your chance to learn balance, relaxation, and how to walk on ice before winter comes! Tuition is $150 for 10 weeks Our Tuesday daytime beginners class will start October 2, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. New students are accepted for the first few weeks of class.

Tuesday Intermediate classes focus on form work, for those with at least a few months of experience. This ongoing class meets Tuesdays, from 10-11 a.m.

Thursdays from 6-8 p.m. remains our advanced class, for people who are interested in more intense, focused work on form, exercises, push hands, and sword. We will also be studying the Taijiquan Classics this fall.

All classes meet at St Luke's Church at 46th & Colfax Avenue South.

Great River Tai Chi has been offering classes since 1979 in traditional tai chi practice, for health, wellbeing, daily life, and self-defense.

Join us!

Saturday, May 12, 2018

Great River Summer 2018 Tai Chi Classes


Great River T'ai Chi offers classes at all levels, year-round. We focus on practical skills and principles, helping students develop their own unique t'ai chi practice. Classtime is spent reviewing prior material, introducing new moves, working on principles, usage, and theory.

Summer Open House: Sunday, June 3, 2018, 6-7 p.m. Learn how tai chi can help you! Free class, refreshments and movie!

New ten-week beginners class starts Sunday, June 10th, 2018, 6-7 pm. Register at first night of class. (Beginners accepted all of June).

• Sundays       Beginners   6:00-7:00 p.m.
• Sundays       Intermediate    7:00-8:00 p.m.
Tuesdays      Intermediate    10:00-11:00 a.m.
Thursdays    Advanced    6:00-8:00 p.m.

Location: All classes meet at St. Luke's Episcopal Church, 4557 Colfax Avenue South, in Minneapolis, Minnesota, just east of Lake Harriet.

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Tai chi Getting Popular with Millennials


Tai chi millennials_00004811

CNN reports that millennials are seeing benefits of tai chi practice for stress reduction. Locked into leaning over a computer for hours in stressful environments, they are learning to loosen up with this ancient Chinese art. "I live in Southern California, so driving on the freeways, it can be tempting to rush through traffic and go as fast as you can," one interviewee said. "But since I've been doing tai chi, I've been able to stop and pull back and just be like 'all right, here I am in the flow. I'm going to go with it, and if it's slow, that's OK.' "
Read the article here.

Sunday, October 9, 2016

Tai Chi for Seniors.



 
"According to the 2007 National Health Interview Survey, an estimated 2.3 million U.S. adults had used tai chi in the previous 12 months. That number is growing among aging adults for practical reasons: Tai chi requires no special clothing, shoes or equipment, so it’s affordable; it can be done almost anywhere; its slow, relaxed, and fluid movements are less stressful on aging joints and muscles; when practiced with a group, it lends itself to socializing.
"Most important, though, are the physical and mental benefits that tai chi can provide. In studies by medical researchers, this form of exercise addresses common age-related conditions such as chronic pain, loss of balance and stress. Some studies even show that tai chi can increase flexibility, promote cardiovascular fitness, increase bone mineral density, lower blood pressure and increase aerobic capacity."
 Read this article in full at the National Academy of Sports Medicine website.

Thursday, December 10, 2015

"6 Benefits of Tai Chi for Your Health"

Tai Chi Benefits for Your Health














 


A great article on the benefits of tai chi:

"My senior year of college, a friend and I signed up for a tai chi class offered on campus. We thought it would be an entertaining hour or two every week, and it gave us a few extra course credits. But a week or two in, I realized that the classes were actually something I really loved and valued as a part of my week. I looked forward to the few hours each week where I got to calm my mind and move my body at the same time." Read the whole article at Mother Earth News.

Friday, November 20, 2015

Tai Chi in Everyday Life

Cartoonist James Sturm brings tai chi to worklife—our mentor Maggie Newman's words of wisdom are featured.  See the full cartoon at Medium.

Friday, September 25, 2015

Tai Chi for Fall Prevention

"Minnesota has the nation’s fourth-highest rate of fall-related deaths," the Minneapolis Star-Tribune reported in a recent article about how Tai Chi can prevent falls. Many studies have shown that Tai Chi helps improves many aspects of health, mobility, and balance. State commissioners of health and human services are seen here, following along in a training workshop.

Tai Chi participants can note a dramatic and quick improvement in balance and mobility by practicing even just the basics. Tai Chi is very multi-faceted, and can serve as a mindfulness exercise, as well as a martial art. See Great River's current schedule below for information on beginners classes.



Saturday, September 29, 2012

In Memory of Bataan Faigao

Bataan Faigao, head of Rocky Mountain Tai Chi, has passed away. Bataan visited Great River Tai Chi many times, as did his late wife Jane, and many of our students enjoyed their summer camp in the mountains. We will miss him greatly. We'll have a time to remember Bataan, Thursday, Oct. 4th, 6 p.m. at the studio. 
 The Boulder Camera reported that Bataan was terminally ill, and was on a pilgrimage to China's sacred locales, when he died. He is known as someone who really embodied a deeper sense of tai chi. He had a very quiet way of teaching. He is quoted as saying,

"T'ai-chi Ch'uan is a journey of spiritual discovery. I encourage students to work hard and to adhere to principles," Faigao wrote about his philosophy of teaching the discipline on the foundation's website. "I teach T'ai-chi Ch'uan as a complete system for health, meditation, self-defense, and as a way of the tao. Learning this art is a process that takes care of the external to get to the internal, going back and forth from form to application, understanding and experience."
 Bataan was born Dec. 1, 1944, in Cebu, Philippines. He married Jane Greeley Faigao in 1966; she preceded him in death. They were lifelong students of t'ai chi ch'uan, studying with Grandmaster Cheng Man-ching in New York City from 1968 until Cheng's death in 1975. They moved to Boulder the following year and established the Rocky Mountain T'ai Chi Ch'uan Foundation and directed Naropa University's Traditional Eastern Arts department. A memorial will be held in Boulder on October 6th.

 For the complete article in the Boulder Camera, click here.

Sunday, July 31, 2011

Explore the Many Benefits of Tai Chi

A recent article in the Marlborough, New Zealand newspaper gives a great look at why tai chi practice is good for you.
"Seventy-year-old Lynda Neame said she started modified tai chi classes in 2008 after suffering from concussion, which caused vertigo and dizziness. "I thought I would learn how to stand up straight, walk in a straight line and get control of myself." The benefits proved more extensive.
Mrs Neame also suffered from osteoarthritis and had resigned herself to gradual loss of mobility because of the pain in her shoulders, legs and hips.
"I spent an hour recovering after half an hour in the garden and thought `this will be my life'."
But with the tai chi, she can now also enjoy pilates, bike riding, swimming and her beloved gardening."

How can tai chi benefit you? Find out at classes this fall at Great River Tai Chi. Our beginners' classes will be held Sundays, starting September 18th, at 6 pm, 1940 Hennepin Av. S. 2F. Tuition is $150 for ten weeks of class.

Monday, July 4, 2011

Robert W. Smith, Student of Cheng Man-ch'ing

We note the passing of our taiji "uncle" Mr. Robert W. Smith, July 1, 2011. Mr. Smith studied taiji with Professor Cheng Man-ch'ing in Taiwan, and went on to teach in the Bethesda, Maryland area.
Mr. Smith's copious writings about Professor Cheng and other great masters of the Asian martial arts helped set the stage for taiji and other arts to spread to the United States in the 1960s. Mr. Smith gave workshops in the Minneapolis St. Paul area in the 1970s. For more information, see the Taijiquan Journal blog.